ForumGeneral Discussion ► Your Train of Thoughts
Probably shouldn't have complained then
  
Is this supposed to be a joke?
  
63 followers.
  
stop unfollowing guys, it's not funny. my man w_licky doesn't like this.
  
XD



  
Lol. I was kidding.
  
Don't be jerks to anyone please
  
XD
[images]

Stop it please. I don't react well against jokes.
  
Bro you good man they's just being mean

I'm not even close to 69 lol
  
Thanks, Samsung. If you unfollowed me, follow me back and everyone will be fine.

Another subject, I need help. Has anybody read Shakespeare's Macbeth Act 2 Scene 1, where Macbeth's soliloquy is? The soliloquy starts on Line 44, I think and says, "Is this a dagger which I see before me"
  
omg i love macbeth
  
I would never unfollow one of my friends
  
What the hell is a follower
  
The stock photos got me good.
I wanna print out and frame this page of the thread.
  
W_Licky said:
Another subject, I need help. Has anybody read Shakespeare's Macbeth Act 2 Scene 1, where Macbeth's soliloquy is?

What do you need help with?
  
What does Macbeth ask of Banquo? How does he respond?

The answer starts where it says entreat in line 29. Entreat means ask so that must be the question.
  
I haven't touched the play in a while, but this is the snippet you are talking about:

BANQUO
All's well.
I dreamt last night of the three weird sisters:
To you they have show'd some truth.

MACBETH
I think not of them:
Yet, when we can entreat an hour to serve,
We would spend it in some words upon that business,
If you would grant the time.

BANQUO
At your kind'st leisure.

Macbeth is asking Banquo if he would like to talk more about the prophecy that the witches delivered at some later date. Banquo agrees.

The monologue afterwards is about Macbeth's first sign of guilt and insanity. That is separate from the conversation he has with Banquo.
  
I know what the soliloquy is about. Thanks.

One more question. What can be found out about Banquo's personal character through his interactions with Macbeth in this scene? I barely understand what they're saying.
  
MACBETH
If you shall cleave to my consent, when 'tis,
It shall make honour for you.

BANQUO
So I lose none
In seeking to augment it
, but still keep
My bosom franchised
and allegiance clear,
I shall be counsell'd.

Shakespeare is trying to draw parallels between the two. Banquo is loyal to Macbeth ("keep....allegiance clear"), and similar to him, wishes to raise his rank in honor ("seeking to augment it...I shall be counsell'd"), but unlike Macbeth, has limits he is willing to go ("so I lose none [honour]", "keep my bosom franchised") in order to obtain the status, and limits he is willing to go in order to remain loyal to Macbeth.

In case you need further clarification on the meaning of "keep my bosom franchised", he's essentially saying "keeping my heart good", or "keeping my conscious clear". Unlike Macbeth, he is not willing to murder in order to claim power or status.
  
Learning to be better at handling teasing is a skill you should work to develop. It will benefit you.

There's a ListServ for the local criminal lawyers association that I'm a part of. Because it's lawyers, they argue a lot. I have thus far mostly avoided it to maintain a reputation of professionalism, but today I decided to give in to my troll nature. The worst that can happen is some lawyers think I'm an idiot. Who cares?
  
There's a ListServ for the local criminal lawyers association that I'm a part of. Because it's lawyers, they argue a lot. I have thus far mostly avoided it to maintain a reputation of professionalism, but today I decided to give in to my troll nature. The worst that can happen is some lawyers think I'm an idiot. Who cares?


I'm always fascinated by the discourse communities that're formed around specific professions, hobbies, or niche interests because the nature of them means there's very little cross-pollination and they tend to have a very complicated and distinct "culture".
  
W_Licky said:
I know what the soliloquy is about. Thanks.

One more question. What can be found out about Banquo's personal character through his interactions with Macbeth in this scene? I barely understand what they're saying.


No Fear Shakespeare is a resource you might benefit from.
https://www.sparknotes.com/nofear/shakespeare/macbeth/
  
SparkNotes is cheating. Banned.
  
Nah. You'll be fine.
  
W_Licky said:
SparkNotes is cheating. Banned.

But asking internet randos for help isn't?
  
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