ForumHobbies ► Video Games
I don't, I'll get it on steam at some point though.
  
My house got a switch and we've like only been playing Breath of the Wild.
  
Breath of the Wild is just so good. I'm considering doing another playthrough where I use a weapon until it breaks. I always end up abusing the Master Sword too much.
  
Super Daryl Deluxe is a great experience. I would recommend checking it out if you have $20 or time to watch somebody else play it.
  
Wormwood said:
Breath of the Wild is just so good. I'm considering doing another playthrough where I use a weapon until it breaks. I always end up abusing the Master Sword too much.


I'm trying to get all the shrines with no guides. I have 95 now I think. I was sad when someone told me there were 120 and not 100, just because it'll be hard to get those last 25 or so, but hey more content. I use the master sword to mine rocks haha.
  
I wanted to give BOTW another go around too. I didn't play with any of the DLC.
  
Just finished Ending 4 for Sekiro. Man, what a good game.
  
Borderlands 3 is exclusive to epic games now.


Pirating time
  
Why is everything moving to Epic Games now?
  
Takes 12% cut instead of Steam's 30%. Plus, they waive the 5% fee for using the Unreal Engine.

Plus, not Valve.
  
Actually sounds pretty solid. Thx for explaining.
  
Too bad the Epic Launcher is literally a demonstration on how not to do security on any program. I'm never touching it.
  
It's also got like none of the features that Steam has. It has two person text chat and that's about it.
  
I have to wonder: How did Steam get to be as big as it is now? Were they just lucky they had a product enough people wanted to warrant building a marketplace?

Steam didn't really take off until after The Orange Box was released, right?
  
Yep. I think Portal bought Valve a whole lot of goodwill.
  
Plus Gaben showering sales all over everyone garnered enough reception to become its own meme.
  
How was online gaming different when digital distribution services like Steam or the Epic Store didn't exist?

I have to ask, because I didn't get into online gaming until I was an adult, and by then Steam was the place to buy games.
  
During the early 2000's Xbox live was king for the most part, Halo and CoD were in their heydays. Playstation online started off with free online at first. By the time I got a laptop with the bear minimums for gaming steam was already big.
  
I think the best pre-steam experience was Battle.net (Blizzard). I think you still had to go buy the games at GameStop or whatever, but they provided you with the friends list for the game, chat, and hosted servers.

Other games would just ship with a multiplayer server browser, which would be made up entirely of user-hosted servers. Or ship with integration with something like GameSpy, which was kind of horrid.

Still others would make you type in the IP you wanted to connect to, which meant you were gonna be connecting directly to your friends, or sometimes a server you found through a forum.

Edit: this is on PC, before Xbox Live. Which definitely blew away everything that came before. Halo 2's matchmaking-as-a-service was, frankly, revolutionary. Before that, everything was based around joining servers to play. Halo 2 got out of the way, let you play with your friends, and dropped the stuff that didn't matter.
  
Do you think the proliferation of online gaming has killed local multiplayer, either via LAN or on-the-couch?
  
Short answer: yes, but I think the effect is broader than you propose.

With the Internet being what it is now, kids are spending less time hanging out in person, and more time online. When I grew up, spending time with your friends usually meant going to their house. You might go for a bike-ride or use the pool or play video games, but being in-person was a prerequisite for spending time together.

Almost all the video games that were multiplayer were on the console, which wouldn't get internet until the Dreamcast came around (it had the modem built-in, woo baby). Computer games were mostly (but not entirely) single player experiences. Crucially, you only needed to own one copy of a game to play local multiplayer.

Later we got AIM, which felt revolutionary because you could be at your own house, and if you saw your friend pop online, you could immediately be hanging out. I guess it's not that different from a group phone call, but none of my friend group did that.

We'd still get together for LAN parties (god we were fucking nerds), because voice chat wasn't common, video chat was nonexistent and latency sucked even for online games. We'd all pile into somebody's basements with our desktop computers, and play video games and watch anime from like 2pm to 11am.

Xbox Live was a big deal. My younger brother made quite a few good friends through Halo 2, and they'd hang out in party chat even when not playing the game. The broadband requirement seemed harsh at the time, but it was necessary to enable voice & low-latency gaming.

Nowadays you kids have like, thirty different ways to connect online. You got your Discords, you got the Tumblrs and the Twitters and the Snapping of the Chats. You don't need to hang out in person to hang out, and you're used to connecting with your friends through the lens and framework of video games / chat apps / social media. I'm an old enough of a fart that I still feel weird about voice chat, let alone video chatting with my friends.

So playing games together online instead of in person is just one aspect of the larger trend - y'all do everything online. Not all the time, for sure, but so much of it.

P.S: Late highschool / college was when it really started to shift, for me (freshman year of 2005). Me and my new college buds became World of Warcraft fanatics, spending more time hanging out in-game than in-person, even though we literally were four rooms apart. We'd still play Halo and stuff together, but looking back it was definitely an inflection point for me.
  
I think I will always prefer playing video games with local multiplayer when possible. It feels better to actually be with my friends and other people who matter to me. Also minimal if any lag.
  
Do you think the proliferation of online gaming has killed local multiplayer, either via LAN or on-the-couch?


It's made big-name single player campaign oriented games much harder to find. The success of WoW and DotA effectively destroyed any chance of Blizzard putting out another Warcraft RTS game (as far as I'm aware), and many "single player" games require you to be online (Diablo 3 had that infamous server crash). Even Bethesda seems to be trying to switch their big sellers (both Fallout and TES) to exclusively multiplayer formats.
  
Brendan said:
It's also got like none of the features that Steam has. It has two person text chat and that's about it.

Upvote, it also doesn't have Linux support.
  
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