ForumTouchy Subjects ► Drug addictions
I figured I’d put it here. Where my fellow addicts at? I’m guessing any addicts (or former) here are (or were) addicted to things way worse than me. Cigarettes is all I got. Quitting fucking sucks.

I know there are people here who smoke or at least have smoked. Any one here ever been to an AA or NA meeting? Before and after each meeting, everyone is slamming coffee and takin cigs straight to the face. At least they aren’t drinking or taking other drugs.

I remember there was a time when I was more or less addicted (but not abusing, ask me for clarification if you don’t understand) to amphetamine. Not methamphetamine. I ain’t gonna take something Jimbo or Boudreau made in a plastic bag and an oven.

I just figured that since it’s been a long time we’ve had a thread like this, I’d make a new one. And hey, I feel bad about bashing all y’all for how y’all post in TS. This is a thread where I think sentence by sentence dissection will be useful. If you have the energy, be a dickbag. Let’s get the party started.
  
General drug addictions thread.
  

I know there are people here who smoke or at least have smoked. Any one here ever been to an AA or NA meeting? Before and after each meeting, everyone is slamming coffee and takin cigs straight to the face. At least they aren’t drinking or taking other drugs.

I haven't been, but I rehearse regularly in an AA/NA meeting room at a church. Sure enough there's a coffee machine in there, not to mention about forty unique kinds of pamphlets. Oh and also their steps and rules on big cloth banners. Going to those meetings seems uncomfortable as it is, let alone if you're not christian enough to fit half the tenets. One would think a last resort option like that would be a little more generalized.
  
As with any groups that contain a significant number of people, there are of course varying degrees of commitment. There are a large group of people at meetings who are court ordered to be there.
Additionally, not everyone categorizes or needs to categorize caffeine as an addiction. The difference between caffeine and alcohol is that most people who consume caffeine don't do it at the cost of everything they hold dear. They do not obsess about it.
I also haven't seen the statistics on it, but from what I have seen a good many of the people who stick around long term (3-5+ years) drop smoking entirely.

Nothing in either of the two programs demand that you believe in the judeo-Christian god. It is your own dogma that causes you to read the steps/traditions that way.
  
From 12 steps:
1. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol—that our lives had become unmanageable.
2. Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.
4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
5. Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
7. Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.
8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God, as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.
12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these Steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

IDK, points 3, 6, 7, and 11 seem like they pretty much demand a belief in a higher power that sounds a lot like a monotheistic god. I don't think that they make any sense for an atheist.
  
ecr674 said:

I know there are people here who smoke or at least have smoked. Any one here ever been to an AA or NA meeting? Before and after each meeting, everyone is slamming coffee and takin cigs straight to the face. At least they aren’t drinking or taking other drugs.

I haven't been, but I rehearse regularly in an AA/NA meeting room at a church. Sure enough there's a coffee machine in there, not to mention about forty unique kinds of pamphlets. Oh and also their steps and rules on big cloth banners. Going to those meetings seems uncomfortable as it is, let alone if you're not christian enough to fit half the tenets. One would think a last resort option like that would be a little more generalized.


I actually think the focus on religion makes a lot of sense, especially when you consider that folks who are alcoholics are often struggling in their personal lives both for reasons related and unrelated to their alcohol consumption. Religion provides a different focus and an instant community. There are very few other things able to do that. Community and support amongst friends is huge to recovering from any kind of addiction, and religion is somewhat uniquely suited to provide that.
  
Most meetings of AA are open to the public. You can sit in on one. I would highly suggest it, as AA touts one of the highest (will link) success rates of all treatment options. Most attendees will be willing to talk to you (yes, even if you state you have no interest in joining, or have no problem with drugs/alcohol) about exactly what the steps mean about a higher power.
There is a section in the book Alcoholics Anonymous titled "We agnostics" which outlines some of these principles. PDFs can be found online.
  
My impression from the AA meetings I sat in on with a couple of my friends was that the “higher power” is whatever “higher power” of your preference. Not specifically any abrahamic god. There was even an atheist there talking about how the power he consults is the workings of reality, and no one found a problem with that. Most of them were Christians, but keep in mind that this was way down in the Deep South.
  
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