ForumTouchy Subjects ► All religions are equal
Most of the religions are very similar and it is the people who are making them into something they are not. I will give you an example: Greek mythology. It is a mythology you may say, it was not real. Sure. There was one main god: Zeus and smaller gods but each of them was "responsible" for something else like Apollo for poets, Hephaisteus for blacksmiths etc.
Now, moving on to Catholicism. One god, and a bunch of minor saints responsible for whatever.

Do you see a pattern? It is all the same or at least a genesis of it is. It is us, people, who them take such system and turn it into something terrible most often.

That guy from pozycjonowanie
  
What's your link for?
  
Also Greek religion was 100% not like that. Zeus was not the 'main god' that was worshipped everywhere with smaller, more specific gods for other things. Different gods were worshiped in different capacities at different times in different places.

Also, what about Protestant Christianity, which doesn't do saints? Or Jainism, which really doesn't do gods at all?
  
I've encountered a lot of religous/spiritual people in real life and on the internet.

In my opinion not all religions are created equally.
  
Everything's equal if you look at it from far enough away and squint with the lights off.
  
People publically make an effort to avoid comparing religion or to make religions all seem equally valid. That's an idealistic view and I wouldn't take it literally. There's undeniable similarities between almost all religion but they can't be conflated. Even within a religion there are irreconcilable differences broken down into denominations.

Just because most recognized religions have a heirarchy doesn't mean they satisfy religious need equally or are equally valuable to humanity. In an effort to avoid marginalizing a religious group for social equality we can't ignore de facto realities.
  
Coldfrost said:
Also, what about Protestant Christianity, which doesn't do saints?


A parallel is that Christ is a demigod just like Hercules; born of a God and human parent. The idea does get a little muddied with each denomination's belief, though.
  
While I like that take on it myself, I'm gonna got ahead and say that 99% of mainstream protestant America where I live Christ is deified as God Himself. I don't know about the rest of the world's Christians. Yes, I'm aware that he's just a prophet according to Islam.
  
If you want a rabbit hole to fall down, the nature of the Trinity is a particularly tangly one.
But Jesus being 'half-God, half-human' isn't a particularly popular interpretation? Jesus not being fully divine screws with the interpretation that the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are equal expressions of God. Jesus not being human makes the fact that he was born, suffered, and died as a part of and for humanity a lot less meaningful.
At its base it's a very different idea than the Greek idea of Demigodhood. And as stated before, there are different groups of Christians with wildly different interpretations of these things.
  
Some of the early schisms regarding Christ is the nature of his flesh. Is he half man half god? Is he a divine projection of god with no real form? Is he a man animated entirely by the Son? It was a huge debate, and it caused divisions in the Early Church that can still be seen today.

Religions all have similar characteristics that allow for them to spread. Most religions, for instance, deal with the supernatural or attempt to explain that which we don't already know. Some just give an overview on to the outlook of society or life itself. Jainism is a good example of one, there is no common creation myth that classifies most religions, but it's still undeniably one. Perhaps political ideologies could be classified as religions, but that's probably a stretch.
  
H O M O O U S I A N
  
The usual Catholic interpretation is that Mary was born without original sin (immaculate conception) which means that while Jesus was half man he was without human failings deriving from our fall from grace.
  
Catholicism does not teach that Jesus is "half man". Like most other modern Christian sects, Catholicism asserts that Jesus is fully God and fully man.
  
As a cradle, Hydrogen is correct
  
I've encountered a lot of religous/spiritual people in real life and on the internet.

In my opinion not all religions are created equally.


My belief is that all religions are created equally, but never preserved equally.
  
You sure about that one? There's not a single religion that was started up where even at its origin you didn't find it more dubious or malignant?
  
Catholicism does not teach that Jesus is "half man". Like most other modern Christian sects, Catholicism asserts that Jesus is fully God and fully man.



As a Lutheran boi I second this and I'm pretty sure most Christian's agree
  
It sounds a lot like splitting hairs. If you have two parts and are equal amounts each of them...
  
That just sounds like two halves with extra steps, haha.
  
It might be easier to think of it as how, say, an apple can be entirely an apple and entirely a fruit at the same time, especially if you consider God to be an all-encompassing sort of thing? I am not really educated on this, though, so I'm just spitballing here.
  
Yea but apple is a sub-class of fruit. Fruit contains apples, oranges and the rest, and you can't have an apple without being a fruit. If Human was a subclass of God then you couldn't be all human without being all God.

I dunno. Someone with more theology?
  
An excerpt from the Athanasian Creed, quoted in the hypostatic union article I linked above:
From the Athanasian Creed:
He is God from the essence of the Father, begotten before time; and he is human from the essence of his mother, born in time; completely God, completely human, with a rational soul and human flesh; equal to the Father as regards divinity, less than the Father as regards humanity. Although he is God and human, yet Christ is not two, but one. He is one, however, not by his divinity being turned into flesh, but by God's taking humanity to himself. He is one, certainly not by the blending of his essence, but by the unity of his person. For just as one human is both rational soul and flesh, so too the one Christ is both God and human.
My takeaway from studying various historical doctrines of Jesus' humanity and divinity in college was "if it's comprehensible, it's probably considered a heresy." It's been a while, so I found this site that has a nice list of these early heresies.
  
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